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An “Olfactory Labyrinth” by Maki Ueda

Walking through a museum, you’ll likely consume most artworks using your eyes. Enjoying the output of olfactory artist Maki Ueda, who uses scent as her primary medium, however, requires your nose⁠—and sometimes takes place in spaces with no visual

Neil Chapman. (Courtesy Neil Chapman)

Scents are among the most powerful, and the most personal, sensory triggers. Because the olfactory nerve connects directPerfume: In Search of Your Signature Scent, deeply understands the connections between smells and feelings. A driven, self-taught student of fragrance and its hisThe Black Narcissus—a captivating combination of technical and historical analysis of scents, pop cultural musings, and personal memoir—he illuminates the myriad facets of scent and its powers, revealing his encyclopedic knowledge of

Votary’s Lavender and Chamomile Pillow Spray

In a world in which fitful sleep is all too common—more than a third of American adults don’t get enough rest—any serenity-inducing bedtime ritual is worth giving a go. But if listening to white-noise machines and banishing your science proves that the ingredients typically used in the sprays produce measurable effects that help facilitate relaxation: Lavender


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When the French luxury goods conglomerate LVMH tapped creative director Jonathan Anderson to helm Loewe in 2013, it charBotanical Rainbow, released in March, that includes myriad botanically inspired perfumes, bottled in a kaleidoscope of colors.

A bottle of Loewe perfume on a straw chair

It’s been two years, three months, five days and a few hours since I last set foot in a five-star Paris hotel room (but Papier d’Arménie. After tearing off a thumb-length strip, I fold it up like an accordion, place it on a ceramic dish along the paper’s t

Papier d’Arménie burning papers

A species of cypress native to central Japan, hinoki is prized for its deeply fragrant scent, and its soft-wood timber is used to build a range of buildings and interiors—fHinoki is not only a material, it is a spiritual and aesthetic concept,” says Italian expat Iacopo Torrini of Kobe-based Bartok Design, a top exporter of the wood. “Hinoki grows straight. Its color is light and its fragrance is fresh but delicate.” Despite its ubiquity in modern times, he aHinoki symbolizes purity and sincerity, therefore it is the preferred choice for buildings dedicated to the gods, as in the sh

A hinoki bathtub in a concrete room with a small tree.

The metaverse is expanding by the minute, and speculation abounds as to what each of us might want to do there. Attend vbe like to do these things. What exactly will virtual experiences sound like, or feel like, or taste like? Dare we ask … w

A trigeminal-based temperature illusion device developed by Jas Brooks, Steven Nagels, and Pedro Lopes. (Courtesy Jas Brooks)

Scents are among the most powerful, and the most personal, sensory triggers. Because the olfactory nerve connects directPerfume: In Search of Your Signature Scent, deeply understands the connections between smells and feelings. A driven, self-taught student of fragrance and its hisThe Black Narcissus—a captivating combination of technical and historical analysis of scents, pop cultural musings, and personal memoir—he illuminates the myriad facets of scent and its powers, revealing his encyclopedic knowledge of

Neil Chapman. (Courtesy Neil Chapman)